A Cross Continent Learning Round Up

DSC02805

What do you get when you combine 120 students in two classrooms in two different continents to share their research? A cross continent learning round up of course!

DSC02793

This morning (7:30 am Seattle) and afternoon (5:30pm Durban) our two schools – Cougar Ridge Elementary in Bellevue, Washington, USA and Highbury Preparatory School in Hillcrest, South Africa made the world a little smaller via Skype.

Our students walked into the library with breakfast and the boys at Highbury were looking forward to a South African “braai” which is similar to our barbeque. Their head master (principal) was cooking a special kind of sausages for all the 5th grade boys.

The head master of Highbury cooks boerewors (sausages) while the boys Skyped with us.

The head master of Highbury cooks boerewors (sausages) while the boys Skyped with us.

These students broke down the physical classroom walls and connected virtually for nearly an hour. Their conversations crossed two continents and 13,000 miles. It’s a perfect diagonal line between our schools from the northwest corner of the US to the southeast corner of Africa!

DSC02789

What did they talk about? Fun topics that kids are interested in like what does your school look like, what kind of classes do you take, what can you play on outside during recess and breaks, what sports do you play, what are your favorite books or where do you go to get some fast food?

This student dressed for the part as he did a quick explanation of American football and our Seattle Seahawks.

When the librarian Louise MacLeod, technologist Desiree Dunstone and I spoke at Highbury in July, we agreed that our goal was for our students to get to know each other as peers and therefore, the topics they would research and share needed to be kid-friendly. We divided up our 5th grade classes into groups, assigned topics, and the students got busy. For the past 5-6 weeks, the teams have been collaborating and collecting information to share with their counterpart classrooms. Today was celebration and share day!

DSC02794

Topic by topic team representatives spoke via Skype sharing pieces of their cultures with one another. With only an hour  and 22 topics, we couldn’t go in depth on camera. Each team was only able to share a sentence or two of the highlights of the research. However, with OneDrive, we are able to share the complete research projects with each other and will use class time to view the student work in our respective schools.

DSC02810

“We like going to Starbucks and MacDonalds.”

It turns out we both enjoy going to MacDonalds and KFC! Starbucks isn’t in Durban yet, but we both have Burger King. One group also helped us understand what the Durban “bunnychow” is (a bread and curry sandwich).

DSC02812

KFC is popular in Durban.

 

DSC02808

A camera, computer, Skype and a great internet connection brings students from different cultures together.

We learned about the Big 5 animals and how there is a serious poaching problem of white rhinos in South Africa. The rhinos are killed for their tusks which are then sold to people in other countries who believe the tusks have medicinal qualities. This group in the video explains that the African elephants have ears shaped like the continent of Africa.

I’ve never taken on a Skype experience on this scale before, but I can say it was worth every second of preparation time. I have listened to the excitement build for weeks and then to see students connecting with each other today was priceless. This morning we were all a little nervous and a lot excited before our call began. Yet, the nerves melted away as everyone discovered we are all the same – just separated by continent. These virtual connections make the world a smaller place and bring the learning inside – without borders. It was hard to say goodbye and I know this is the first of many learning opportunities our students will make.

"Thank you Highbury Prep!"

“Thank you Highbury Prep!”

If you want to learn more about how you can use Skype in the Classroom, visit the website. Join the Skype-a-Thon on December 3-4, 2015 and be part of a global movement to celebrate learning without borders. If you would like to learn more about our connection with Highbury Prep and Books to Africa program, here is a post about my trip to South Africa, a video , and a recap of three years of friendship.

Punctuation, Research and Halloween Fun!

20151031-062636.jpg

For week #4 of the Global Read Aloud Amy Krouse Rosenthal author study, we laughed our way through exclamation mark. This punctuation mark doesn’t understand why he is so different from the periods, until he meets question mark. Her rapid fire questions irritate him so much, he finally yells for her to STOP! In that moment he discovers his voice and learns that his uniqueness is his gift! Again, Rosenthal weaves the concepts of individuality into seemingly silly books, adding a layer of depth to each. Is it a book about an exclamation mark or it is more?

20151031-063715.jpg

When it comes to Halloween books, I still love my favorite 13 Nights of Halloween by Rebecca Dickinson. There are other versions now, but this goody from 1996 has such detailed illustrations, that I can’t let it go. I also add a little spin to it but singing it to the tune of “12 days of Christmas”. If you ever find this out of print goodie, pick it up.

20151031-064944.jpg

The fifth graders have spent their class time for the past month researching information about our school, the area, favorite grocery stores, landmarks, facts about Seattle and Washington as well as other related topics. They are creating mini-reports to share digitally with the level 5 students at Highbury Preparatory School in Hillcrest, South Africa. Hillcrest is a suburb of Durban, on the northern east coast of South Africa.

20151031-065751.jpg

This school is one of our partners in my Books to Africa literacy program delivering books we send to neighboring schools who need books for their libraries. On November 19th, the 5th graders have the option of participating in a before school Skype call to share the results of their research and virtually meet their partners 10,000 miles away. I can’t wait to see my friends again, even if it is through a computer!

 

Finally it was Friday- Book Character Day! Despite a storm that knocked power out for two hours, the hallways and classes were filled with smiling faces. Who can resist a little literary fun at school? Certainly not the students, or the teachers. Here are a few of the costumes I saw during the day.

20151031-071551-2cpnhdp.jpg
20151031-071558-2bb2i2c.jpg
The week ended with the PTSA sponsored Spooky Spaghetti evening. Volunteers spent countless hours turning our school into a monster zone.

20151031-070819.jpg

The Dads set up dinner, made all the spaghetti and served to over 700 spooky guests!

20151031-071011.jpg

20151031-071022.jpg

20151031-071042.jpg

20151031-070451-218vk0k.jpg

 

Next week the monsters will be back for our annual Scholastic Bookfair! Books go on sale Tuesday through Friday. Students can shop during the day and after school. There are extended hours and a movie night on Thursday. Due to the set up of the fair, students will not be able to checkout books. Everyone can keep their books for an extra week.
Often at this time of year people wonder how they can help others in need. We have the answer! We have local and global literacy programs to promote reading.
Our student council is collecting new books or change from your purchases to buy new books for the children at Swedish Hospital. The new Books to Africa program is also accepting cash donations from pennies to ??? which will be used to buy postage to send boxes of gently used books to our partners in Africa.
We hope to see you all there!

Fair is Not Equal

 Pre-"WHOOSH!" lukexmartin via Compfight

As I scanned the room, I could see that every hand was in the air. I had asked my students to raise their hand if they had ever said or heard someone else say, “That’s Not Fair!” No surprises to my eyes, or to a parent volunteer in the room who said, “I hear it everyday at my house”. What is fair or not fair, was the topic of Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s book for week 3 for the author study in The Global Read Aloud.

its-not-fair
In this very amusing book, the characters whine about the unfairness of not having something another character has. The koala bear is unhappy about always being on the bottom tree-limb bunk, a child is angry because he can’t have a pet giraffe, a girl is sad because she has to wear glasses and the pig is angry because the bird took all the wings. The babies are crying because nothing is the same. Every situation is unfair, unfair, unfair.
notfair_detail

Bunk-Plunk-detail
Or, is it?

Krouse’s book is the perfect introduction about the definition of fairness vs. equality. Is fairness when everyone has the same thing? Is it good when we are always treated equally?

fairness

We talked about the definition of equal means that everyone gets exactly the same thing. For example, everyone get a fork to use to eat their food, or everyone gets a bandaide for their cut. These examples work until we think about the people who use chopsticks to eat and they have been given a fork to use. Is it fair or equal that the utensil they received is exactly like everyone else’s when what they really need is a pair of chopsticks?

Fairness on the other hand is when everyone gets what they need in order to be successful.

This definition is not easy to understand at first. In class, I used the example of eyeglasses to illustrate the concept. I wear glasses to see and in every class, there was at least one or two students who also need glasses. We need glasses. If we don’t have glasses, we can’t see.  Then I posed the question, “Would it be fair or equal, if every student in class was told that they also had to wear glasses because I wear them?” We talked about their answers and they began to understand the difference.

bandages2

Then I handed out a bandaid to each student. I asked them to point to a part on their body where they have been cut in the past and needed a bandage. We pretended to put the bandage on that part of their body to illustrate that it was fair for each person to put the bandaid on different parts of their bodies because it was where they needed it. However, then I asked them to put the bandage on the back of their hand in a place I decided what right. The students quickly understood that this situation was equal, but not fair because they couldn’t put the bandage where they needed it.

At the end of the lesson, I followed up with the sentence that I will always be fair in how I treat students, but it won’t always feel equal, and that’s okay. Next week, we will learn about punctuation marks with the book Exclamation Mark, and slip in a favorite Halloween book as well!

Next week is also a Global Read Aloud Random Acts of Kindness week. Amy Krouse Rosenthal wanted to contribute to events for GRA15 and came up with the idea. You can read more about it on the GRA blog post here. Amy has videos with kindness ideas you can try at home and at school. What kindness will you spread? If you are a student, make sure you talk to your family and have them part of the conversation. Please use the hashtag #GRAK15 to share your ideas and acts! Leave a comment and let me know how it goes!

untitled (7)

 

 

What do you see?

th2V50QANA

For week 2 in the Global Read Aloud 2015 we read Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld (illustrator). Is the illustration a duck or is it a rabbit? It really depends on your point of view and what you see. This funny picture book helps children understand that there are two sides to every story and sometimes we need to look at another point of view. Here’s a video with a short version of the book.

thX32D94U2After we read the book, we gathered data about how many of us saw a duck or a rabbit and the reasons why using evidence from the text of the book.

IMG_6669

Then the students colored their own paper if they thought it was a duck or a rabbit.

IMG_6670
We also tweeted with our friends in Klein, Texas as our classes tried to figure out if the drawings were ducks or rabbits. Because the intent of the Global Read Aloud project is to build connections around the country and globe, I have started a Cougar Ridge Twitter account. We talk about our lessons with other library classes. Follow us at @CRidgeLibrary
duck tweets
With the third graders, we took it up a notch and studied some common optical illusion drawings. Sometimes it is not easy to see the two views of a drawing.

IMG_6677

In the drawing below there is an old man and a young man. I could not see the young man and it took numerous students coming forward to try to explain how to see the young man. To be truthful, I was ready to give up, but the students wouldn’t let me. Finally two students helped me break through my optical illusion block.  My cheer of “I see it!” made everyone laugh! Can you see both?
IMG_6678

I was thrilled when after our lesson students found the optical illusion books to check out! I would also like to thank Kelly at http://thefirstgradefairytales.blogspot.com for the Duck! Rabbit! lesson ideas posted on Pinterest. Next week we will be reading about what is fair in the book That’s Not Fair!

Chop, Chop, Chop!

CQj12OrUEAAqcZn
How are you at using Chopsticks? We got some great practice last week after we read the book Chopsticks by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. This book about how two chopsticks learn about independence  when one chopstick breaks his “stick” and then can’t do everything with his partner while he’s resting and healing. It’s a book about chopsticks, friendship, independence and learning new skills.

chopsticks

Chopsticks is book one in our six week Amy Krouse Rosenthal author study. Amy was chosen as the featured author in the 2015 Global Read Aloud program. This project started October 5th and will run for approximately 6 weeks.  The idea behind it is very simple; teachers around the world read the same book aloud to their students and then use technology to share the reading experience with these other classrooms.  It is a free project and it fits perfectly into the standards we have to cover.

During the project, our class will be reading and connecting with students around the world who are reading the same book.  We will use technology tools such as Twitter and this blog to facilitate these connections and conversations.

The founder, Permille Ripp, a teacher in Wisconsin, started “GRA” in 2010 with one goal in mind: Connect the world with one book. Now it’s grown to over 500,000 children in 60+ countries around the world.  This project will allow for our students to use technology tools in a meaningful way, as well as learn about other cultures, all while listening to a fantastic read aloud.
gra15

Our school is one of the red markers hovering over Washington. There is only 1 marker per state or country. Each week we will be reading one of the selected picture books and then connecting with other classrooms around the world via Twitter. Students will get an authentic global experience by talking about books with other librarians and students.

Speaking of connections – we have a new school Twitter account! This account is only for our library classroom use only. If you are a family member,  teacher or librarian with a designated library/classroom account, please follow us. Search for @CRidgeLibrary and you will see our #GRA15 updates live from our library.

choices

Families who would like to participate at home can also join the GRA movement. I highly suggest you visit the Global Read Aloud website. You will find the books chosen per grade level and connections you can make with the books and sometimes the authors.

Happy Reading!

Intro to Makerspaces

 

Our students had their first introduction to Makerspaces in the Library. Makerspace in the library is all about dreaming, creating and inventing. The activities focus on  Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Art and Math.  Think Legos, K’Nex, Cardboard creations, origami, LED light crafts, 3D MagnaTiles. Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher on Twitter, recently published an article Essential Information on Maker Movement on her blog explaining what the Makerspace Movement is all about.   Sylvia Martinez, coauthor of Invent to Learn, also believes libraries are perfect places for makerspaces. Students can come to a safe learning environment and have the freedom to create and experiment.

This is our first year with Makerspaces in my new library, but my second year using it as a librarian. You can read more about other blog posts here, here and here. In our introductory experience, I opened stations with 3D MagnaTiles, Legos, Snap Circuits, Coding, Magformers, Ozobot Mini-robot, and plastic cups. Students listened to the story Press Here by Herve Tullet, which is such an amazing example of creativity and simplicity in early children’s literature,and then they had time for Makerspace and check out time. Here are some images from the week.image image image image
image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image
image

image

Judging from the enthusiasm of the students all week, Makerspaces will be a fun learning addition to our library curriculum.

Book Care Funny Videos

7518002208_52b2a7d7c9_z

Hurray! Everyone is checking out library books and taking them home to read. We have also been learning about book care rules to make sure they don’t get damaged when they go home. To help out, the second graders made some Sock Puppet and ChatterPix videos in the iPad. We hope you enjoy our latest funny book care videos!

Keep your books away from siblings!

Keep your books out of the rain!

Please don’t take your library books outside on the playground!

Please don’t eat near your books!

Please don’t step on your books!

Keep your books away from little sisters!

Thank you second graders for helping us learn these important rules!

A Dot-Art-a-licious Week

 

dotboy

We made our Dot Art Mark last week in grades K-5 to celebrate #dotday15! During International Dot Day or week, children all over the world read the book The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds and celebrated what makes them unique and creative. Over a million children in countries around the globe took part in this fun reading activity. Many of our blogging buddies participated around the country and in other nations including Mrs. Camp in Texas, Mrs. Monaghan in Middleham, England, and Mrs. Moore in Michigan.

make your mark

In library class we read The Dot and then the students in each grade learned about a different artist. After the mini-lesson, the students imitated that style of art to create their own awesome dot.

dot3

dot1

dot2

We also had a special guest Ms. Bower from New Zealand visit our library during Dot Week. Ms.Bower has met Peter H. Reynolds many times and enjoyed reading The Dot to some classes with her Kiwi accent!

dotgraceboarder

This week in class, the first graders will be viewing the dots made by the students in our partner library in Texas. Mrs. Camp, the librarian at Benfer Elementary, and I have been collaborating on various activities in recent years, but this is the first time we have shared Bobcat Dot Day art! Since I moved schools, we are now both Bobcats. It will be fun learning how to make quality comments on their blog. They even learned The Dot song by Emily Arrows and Peter H. Reynolds.

dotcroppedborder

 

Still wondering about that book? Watch Peter H. Reynolds read his book on this video.

We are all so talented in ways we don’t even realize. Let me know in a comment how you are special, creative and talented. How are YOU making your mark on the world today?

make your mark

It’s a New School and New Year!

 

Greetings from my new school! I have a slightly new name for my blog to incorporate the mascot for my new school. The Bulldog Readers would like to welcome the Bobcats to this blog! We are going to read and learn together this year. Thank you to Summer M. Tribble for the Creative Commons photo of these bobcat kittens. “Bobcat-Texas-9110″ by Summer M. Tribble (daughter of David R. Tribble) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons –

cropped-bulldog-and-bobcat-1t79x7e.jpg

Our first mission is participating in International Dot Day. All week we are celebrating the fabulous book The Dot by Peter Reynolds and taking on the challenge of making our mark and seeing where it takes us.

dot_day_2012_v01-14dy02q-1ntxsu1

In my next post I will show some of our art in Dot Day style!

All endings are beginnings

 

It never fails to be true. Life happens. Not always the way you planned.

ENDINGS QUOTE

Most of you know I spent three weeks in South Africa this summer visiting the schools where we send books for our Books to Africa project. The trip was life-changing for me. In both of the impoverished schools I visited, the only books the children had to read were the ones we have sent. The impact our students are making on the education of these children is real.

If you would like to read more, I published a post on the Bulldog Reader Blog The principal at Pula Madibogo Primary School  also published a video on YouTube about our experience there together.  I left South Africa inspired to do more for these children.

Emirates Airlines A380 by cool images786 (4)[1]

On the way home however, my life took an unexpected turn. I received an invitation to come back to teach in the Issaquah School district. When you are squished like a sardine in the back of a plane for 14 hours, you have a lot of time to think. I love teaching at Bell. I love the students. I love the staff. I love the parents and Bell community. Sadly, one thing stands in the way – my commute. Driving to school from Sammamish has been taking up to 1 hour each way. The day after I returned home, I applied for the position.

libraries

Last week I accepted the offer to be the new librarian at Cougar Ride Elementary School. They are looking forward to adopting the Books to Africa program into their school activities as well. As sad as I am to leave Bell, the decision to teach in my home district feels right. If circumstances were different, I wouldn’t even be writing this blog post.

Working with all of you at Bell has made the days and years fly by. You have always supported my ideas to make the library a great place for kids to learn. Bell has a fantastic community of readers. I learned the ropes of librarianship at Bell and will cherish the memories from my years there.

I know another librarian will come to Bell who is the perfect match for the school. This person will be your new beginning. After all, all stories have a beginning, middle and an end. I hope the Books to Africa will continue at Bell as well.

Thank you for being part of my story. Check back to this blog too. It may make some kind of transition, but it’s not ending.

Mrs. Hembree